April 09, 2021

Neguse ranked 8th most effective Dem in US House

The Center for Effective Lawmaking has ranked Colorado Rep. Joe Neguse’s work during the 116th Congress among the best.

In the center’s Legislative Effectiveness Scores released last month, Neguse cracked the top ten among House Democrats, finished No. 8 among them and earned distinction as the top freshman legislator for “exceeding expectations.”

Neguse’s overall score, 3.509, was far behind New York Rep. Nita Lowey, whose 10.302 mark was nearly double the next closest lawmaker. House Reps. Michael McCaul, Texas; Chris Smith, New Jersey; and John Katko, New York, were the most effective Republicans.

To rank lawmakers’ effectiveness, the center took 15 metrics into account, including the bills that each member sponsors, how far they move through the process and how substantial their policy proposals are.

For example, Rep. Lowey was chair of the powerful Appropriations Committee. She retired at the end of the session after sponsoring 30 bills, 14 of which passed the House and seven became law.

In contrast, the average House member sponsored 20 bills with only one law produced for every two House members, according to the center. For his part, Neguse sponsored 54 bills with five passing the House chamber and three becoming law.

“Research suggests that performance in a legislator’s freshman term is highly correlated with subsequent lawmaking effectiveness, as well as with their overall career trajectory,” the center noted.

A Democrat, Neguse represents Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District, which encompasses Broomfield, Clear Creek, Gilpin, Grand, Larimer and Summit counties, along with portions of Boulder, Eagle, Jefferson, Park and Weld counties.

Neguse is a member of the House Judiciary Committee, in which he serves on the Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law; Immigration and Citizenship; and Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet subcommittees. Neguse is the vice chair of the Immigration and Citizenship subcommittee.

According to the center, it also produced benchmark scores for each legislator to try to account for the legislator’s level of seniority, party affiliation and committee or subcommittee chair positions, which all can dramatically affect an effectiveness score.

For example, the center noted that in the 116th House, Republican lawmakers had an average score of 0.534, compared to 1.398 for the Democrats in the majority. Also, committee chairs had an average of 3.080.

In the Senate, those averages were 0.933 for the minority party, 1.056 in the majority party and 1.432 among committee chairs.


By:  Eli Pace
Source: Sky-Hi News